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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Alan Grayson
U.S. Representative D-Florida, Foreign Affairs Committee member
CSPAN 08/01/2013
Video clip of Cole from NSA hearing: Unless you go through the procedures of documenting that, there is reasonable articular of all suspicion that the phone number you want to ask about is associated with terrorists. Host: reaction? Grayson: it is irrelevant. It is misleading as well. Every time you make a phone call, every time i make a phone call, every time your listeners call into this show, the NSA gets a record of that call. That is what people are concerned about.
Alan Grayson
U.S. Representative D-Florida, Foreign Affairs Committee member
CSPAN 08/01/2013
..Defense Department is supposed to defend us from foreign enemies. Domestically, we rely upon the FBI and the department justice. Notwithstanding, for the past few years, the NSA has gone wild and conducted domestic surveillance on literally every single American, all 320 million people who have a telephone. That is wrong and unconstitutional. Our founding fathers were quite clear on this point. The NSA has made a mockery of that.
Alan Grayson
U.S. Representative D-Florida, Foreign Affairs Committee member
CSPAN 08/01/2013
There was a shocking report a few years ago that the NSA was actually listening to phone calls of a very personal nature between deployed servicemen overseas and their wives. Phone sex actually. And NSA agents were literally passing around the tapes of phone sex calls that had been made by servicemen to their wives. Apparently, none of the NSA agents who were conducting that
Alan Grayson
U.S. Representative D-Florida, Foreign Affairs Committee member
CSPAN 08/01/2013
Grayson continued: so-called investigation were ever punished. That is an illustration of the kind of abuse you can expect to arise in a program that watches everyone all the time just like big brother. It does cost a lot of money but unfortunately few members of Congress know how much it costs because it’s part of the so-called black budget, the part of the budget that is kept secret even from members of Congress, it is safe to say that it cost billions upon billions of dollars for us to be watching us, an activity that the Constitution forbids because there is no probable cause and no particularity and it needs to (stop).
Alan Grayson
U.S. Representative D-Florida, Foreign Affairs Committee member
CSPAN 08/01/2013
The Amash Conyers amendment was a bipartisan effort to rein in the NSA and to stop domestic surveillance that’s in violation of the Constitution. I voted for it. I lobbied my colleagues very heavily for it. I was responsible for the drafting of the letter, a dear colleague letter, that I personally circulated to literally a couple of hundred of my colleagues on the floor of the house. I made the argument in favor of respecting the
Alan Grayson
U.S. Representative D-Florida, Foreign Affairs Committee member
CSPAN 08/01/2013
Grayson continued 1A: constitution and respecting the rights of Americans to their own privacy. The amendment just barely failed. I think we will see it again. I’m sure we’ll see something like it again. It simply would have inserted an order into each FISA order, a single sentence into each FISA order, that the court issues reminding people that domestic surveillance is unconstitutional without probable cause.
Alan Grayson
U.S. Representative D-Florida, Foreign Affairs Committee member
CSPAN 08/01/2013
Grayson: They are saying that sometimes during the course of the investigation some of this unconstitutional data was consulted. They are not saying it prevented the terrorist attacks at all. They are not saying they would not have otherwise been able to disrupt them with the information they had. That is exactly what is wrong with this. The so-called intelligence community is making these rabid, hysterical claims that in order to keep us safe, we have to spy on ourselves. There are some people who find that convincing. I think it defies common sense and i don't buy it at all.
Alan Grayson
U.S. Representative D-Florida, Foreign Affairs Committee member
CSPAN 08/01/2013
Caller: for standing up for the constitution. Please carry on. Grayson: thank you. It’s very important to me to make sure that we don’t see the militarization of American life. In fact, that is exactly what Osama bin Laden was trying to bring about. He didn’t believe he could destroy enough tall buildings in America in order to do any real damage. What he thought was that we’d turn on each other. And I’m doing my best to prevent that.
Alan Grayson
U.S. Representative D-Florida, Foreign Affairs Committee member
CSPAN 08/01/2013
Grayson continued 1B:I think it is sad. Everyone must recognize that it’s sad that we are perpetually at war. That was the excuse in 1984 for the pervasive domestic surveillance that was depicted by George Orwell in that book. The fact that those countries were constantly at war gave an excuse for the leaders of those countries to engage in pervasive domestic surveillance. The same thing could become true in America. I’m doing whatever I can to stop it.
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